Academic Honesty and Plagiarism

These regulations make up the Academic Honor Code for undergraduate and graduate students at Loyola. The Academic Honor Code applies to all Loyola students, whether enrolled in on-campus or online programs. This includes definitions of academic dishonesty such as plagiarism, and the processes determining findings of academic dishonesty and governing appeals.

If you do not find what you are looking for, please return to Academic Regulations Home. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Student Records at sturec@loyno.edu.


Academic Honor Code 

This Academic Honor Code supersedes policies and procedures related to the Integrity of Scholarship and Plagiarism policies and procedures published in previous University Bulletins for all Graduate (non-Law) and Undergraduate students at Loyola University New Orleans. Law students are to consult the Honor Code published in the Law Bulletin.

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Academic Honor Pledge

In accordance with the Academic Honor Code of Loyola University New Orleans, I pledge I will not cheat, lie, falsify, plagiarize, or participate in any form of unauthorized collaboration, misuse or misrepresentation of my academic work or the academic work of others in any manner.  I will be honest in all academic endeavors and conduct myself in a manner that protects and promotes the intellectual and ethical integrity of myself, others, and the University.

All students, whether enrolled in on-campus or online programs, must acknowledge and agree to be bound by the Academic Honor Code. Each student is required to do so upon their first log-in to LORA, and cannot register for courses or access their account prior to this agreement. 


Academic Honor Code

The Academic Honor Code of Loyola University New Orleans represents the University community’s commitment to the highest intellectual and ethical standards of honesty, integrity, fairness and justice. Violations of the Academic Honor Code include but are not limited to cheating, lying, false citations, falsified data, falsification of academic records, plagiarism, participation in any form of unauthorized collaboration, misuse or misrepresentation of academic work or the academic work of others in any manner, misuse of electronic material, and violation of academic property laws.

A student in doubt about whether a particular course of conduct violates the University’s Academic Honor Code should consult with the course instructor before engaging in that conduct.

Cheating
Cheating is the fraudulent or dishonest presentation of work. Cheating includes but is not limited to:

  • using or attempting to use unauthorized materials in any academic coursework
  • copying, falsifying, destroying, or altering another student's work
  • submitting the same written work in more than one course without prior written approval from the instructors involved
  • dishonestly requesting to make up exams, extend deadlines for submitting coursework
  • plagiarizing in any form

False Citations
False citation is the attribution of intellectual property to an incorrect or fabricated source with the intention to deceive.

Falsified Data
False data are data that have been fabricated, altered, suppressed, manipulated, or contrived in such a way as to be deliberately misleading.

Falsification of Academic Records
Falsification of Academic Records is any attempt to forge or alter academic documentation, includes, but is not limited to, transcripts, letters of recommendation, certificates of enrollment or good standing, registration forms, and medical certification of absence.

Plagiarism
Plagiarism is act of taking the work or ideas of another and representing it as one's own. The Modern Language Association Handbook defines plagiarism as follows:  "Plagiarism involves two kinds of wrongs.  Using another person's ideas, information, or expressions without acknowledging that person's work constitutes intellectual theft.  Passing off another person's ideas, information or expressions as your own to get a better grade or gain some other advantage constitutes fraud" (Seventh Edition, 2009, p. 52).

Unauthorized Collaborations
Unauthorized collaborating is completing coursework with other(s) without prior approval. Students are expected to consult with their instructor prior to engaging in cooperative activities.

Misuse of Electronic Materials and Violations of Academic Property Laws
Access and use of licensed electronic materials are governed by agreements between the University and publishers or sellers of the services.  Students must comply with the prohibitions stated below.

  • selling or public posting of material from these services 
  • sharing your login with anyone else or allowing access to unauthorized users
  • giving away or transferring information from these services to anyone not affiliated with Loyola University New Orleans
  • systematic, large-scale downloading of information, including entire issues of electronic journals or entire electronic books

Other breaches of the Academic Honor Code include:

  • the misrepresentation of material facts or circumstances in relation to examinations, papers, or other evaluative activities
  • the unauthorized use of University academic facilities or equipment, including computer accounts and files
  • the unauthorized recording, sale, purchase, or use of academic lectures, academic computer software, or other course materials
  • the violation of Institutional Review Board (IRB) policies and procedures

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Processing An Alleged Violation

Student Academic Honor Code violations and sanctions are reported either by 1) a course instructor to the Dean’s Office of the college in which the violation occurred or 2) the Associate Dean of the college in which the violation occurred. If there is no designated Associate Dean of the college in which the violation occurred, the Dean or the Dean's designated representative will fill this role. An appeal of a violation and/or sanctions is filed from the accused student to the Academic Integrity Council (AIC).  This method of handling Academic Honor Code violations helps promote university-wide standards of integrity with 1) due process and 2) identification of students with repeat violations across the university.

Instructor Report
A course instructor reports student violations and sanctions using the following process:

Instructor of record for the course
The instructor investigates the matter further, issues findings, and imposes sanctions. Specifically:

  1. The instructor collects and keeps copies of all evidence related to the charge and examines the situation.
  2. If the instructor finds there has been an Academic Honor Code violation, the instructor then issues a sanction. (Potential sanctions defined below.)
  3. The instructor provides the student and the instructor’s Associate Dean written notification of the violation and sanction and a copy of all relevant documentation related to the case. The instructor informs the student of the right to appeal the decision to the Academic Integrity Council following the process found here. The student has the right to request a meeting with the Associate Dean of the college offering the course to review the violation and sanction within five business days of the notification from the instructor. If a meeting with the Associate Dean is requested,
    1. The Associate Dean will review with the student the written notification of the violation and sanction.
    2. If the student believes the violation and/or the sanction is unjust, the Associate Dean directs the student to follow the Academic Honor Code violation appeals process found here. The Associate Dean will review with the student the AIC appeals process.
  4. The Associate Dean collects and keeps copies of all evidence related to the charge and reviews the situation.The Associate Dean makes a notation of the violation in student’s record on the Student Information System (SIS).

Associate Dean Report

If charges of a violation are made against a student from action pertaining either 1) to a particular course or 2) to multiple violations, the Associate Dean of the student’s college investigates the matter further, issues sanctions in writing to the student, and informs the student of the right to appeal the decision following the process found here. The Associate Dean collects and keeps copies of all evidence related to the charge. The Associate Dean makes a notation of the violation in student’s record on the Student Information System (SIS) and notifies the Director of the Honors Program where applicable.

The student has the right to request a meeting with the Associate Dean of the college offering the course to review the violation and sanctions within five business days of the notification from the the Associate Dean. If a meeting with the Associate Dean is requested,

  1. The Associate Dean will review with the student the written notification of the violation and sanction.
  2. If the student believes the violation and/or sanction is unjust, the Associate Dean directs the student to follow the Academic Honor Code violation appeals process found here. The Associate Dean will review with the students the AIC appeals process.

Graduate Programs
Additional steps, clearly outlined in program policies and procedures materials, may be added to the AHC Procedures by individual graduate programs. 

Online Programs
Alternative processes, clearly outlined in online program policies and procedures materials, may be added to the AHC Procedures by individual online programs (undergraduate or graduate) to accomodate the difficulty for face-to-face meetings on Loyola's campus. 

 

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Appeals Procedures

After meeting with the Associate Dean, the student has a right to submit an Academic Honor Code violation appeal form to the AIC within ten business days after being contacted about the violation.  During summer terms, as applicable, a hearing date may not be possible until the subsequent fall semester. Until the grade is finally determined by an AIC, the student’s academic standing, related rights and privileges, and the grade prior to the violation occurred will be upheld. 

Step 1: Accused Student
The accused student completes and submits an Academic Honor Code appeal to the AIC. Appeals should be submitted in writing or via Loyola email to AIC@loyno.edu.

Step 2: Academic Integrity Council Review
The AIC processes the appeal to determine merit.

  1. The AIC Chair provides written notification to the student filing the appeal within five business days of the student filing and Academic Honor Code appeal.
  2. The AIC Chair requests in writing from the appealing student any documents of personal statement and/or other evidence (tests, papers, laboratory reports, etc.) supporting the student’s appeal to the AIC.
  3. The AIC Chair contacts in writing the instructor and the Associate Dean of the college reporting the violation to provide any evidence supporting the violation.
  4. The AIC Chair assembles the AIC consisting of three students and two faculty.
  5. The AIC convenes to review all evidence and decide if the student appeal merits consideration.  The AIC applies the following criteria for consideration of granting an appeal hearing: 1) bias, 2) new evidence, 3) disregard for student rights, and 4) inappropriateness of the sanction.
  6. The AIC communicates the result of case review:
    1. If the AIC finds the appeal does not merit consideration, the AIC Chair will notify in writing to the student, the instructor and the Associate Dean of the college of record and the AIC appeals process ends. The sanctions are upheld; the notation of Academic Honor Code violation remains in the student’s record on the SIS and a copy of the AIC’s decision is added to the student’s Dean’s file. The student has a right to appeal further to the Provost
    2. If the AIC finds the appeal does merit consideration, the AIC Chair will notify in writing the student, the instructor and the Associate Dean of the college of record of the AIC hearing process.

Step 3: Academic Integrity Council Hearing
When the AIC determines student appeal merits consideration, a hearing will ensue.

  1. The AIC chair contacts both the student, the instructor and the Associate Dean of the college of record to inform them of a hearing date and invite them to 1) provide additional documentation and 2) present position statements in person to the AIC, or in an online format if the AIC deems appropriate.
  2. The AIC convenes to review all evidence and determine whether or not to uphold the sanctions.
  3. The AIC Chair provides in writing to the student, the instructor and Associate Dean of the college of record both 1) findings and 2) recommended sanctions (if any) resulting from the AIC appeal investigation.
  4. The AIC’s decision on student Academic Honor Code violations and sanctions becomes the official record.  The student record will be update according the AIC findings on the SIS and in the Dean’s file. The student has the right to appeal further to the Provost.

Online Programs
Alternative processes, clearly outlined in online program policies and procedures materials, may be added to the Appeals Procedures by individual online programs (undergraduate or graduate) to accomodate the difficulty of face-to-face meetings on Loyola's campus. 

 

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Potential Consequences of Violations of the Academic Honor Code

Email of Censure: The instructor of the course or the Associate Dean of the college in which the violation occurred may send an email of censure.  The email will clearly articulate the violation of which the student has been found responsible, reiterate the University’s Academic Honor Code, and clearly spell-out possible consequences if the student violates the Academic Honor Code in the future.  A printout of the email of censure will be placed in the student’s permanent file along with all supporting documentation regarding the case. 

Failing Grade for Assignment: A permanent failing grade may be assigned for the offending course work. The instructor of the course or the Associate Dean of the college in which the violation occurred may issue this sanction. 

Failing Grade for Course: A permanent failing grade may be assigned for the course. To issue this sanction, the instructor of the course requires approval from the Associate Dean of the college in which the violation occurred.  

Academic Suspension: Academic suspension is an appropriate sanction for students found responsible in particularly egregious cases or students who have previously been found responsible for violations of the Academic Honor Code.

The Associate Dean of the college in which the accused student is enrolled submits the recommendation of academic suspension to the Dean of the student’s College for review.  If the Dean concurs with the recommendation, notification of the length of the academic suspension must be sent to the Office of Student Records.  A notation “Academic Suspension” will be placed on the student’s official transcript.  The decision to suspend a student for violating the Academic Honor Code will be made in consultation with the Provost/Vice-Provost for Academic Affairs.

Dismissal from the University: Dismissal from the University is the most severe recommendation that can be made and is reserved for the most egregious acts of academic dishonesty. Students found responsible of violating the University’s policy regarding academic integrity, especially if they have already been suspended from the University, should be considered for permanent dismissal. The Associate Dean of the college in which the accused student is enrolled submits the recommendation to the Dean of the student’s College so that a decision may be rendered.  The decision to permanently dismiss a student from the University will be made by the Provost/Vice-Provost for Academic Affairs.  The notation “Academic Dismissal” will be placed on the student’s official transcript. 

Monitoring and Recording Violations to the Academic Honor Code:

The Academic Integrity Council is responsible for recording and monitoring violations of the Academic Honor Code.  This data will be reported to the Provost’s office every semester.

 

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Updated March 2016